Juvenile Canada Goose‏

Our first Canada gosling of season.  He was an early baby and we had no goose families with babies his age in which to integrate him.  We finally got him adopted by the adults you see in photo.  He has been checked on and is doing great.

Young Canada Goose Finds a Family
Young Canada Goose Finds a Family

A Coyote Pup’s Amazing Story

This male Coyote pup was reluctantly given to us by a person who got it off of Craigslist.  Its litter mates were given out to various people and we were unable to track any of them down.  A very bad circumstance for the remaining pups.  Within a couple of weeks we did get an orphaned female pup from a  different situation and fortunately  we were able to put the two together.   If it can be helped, it is never good to raise an orphaned animal alone; conspecifics should always be kept together.  Coyotes are one of the most high-strung mammals we deal with.  Any human exposure near their enclosure puts them into immediate stress mode and their demeanor is similar to a feral cat loose in a room.  Coyotes require very private quarters during rehabilitation.
Due this high energy ‘craze’;  Jeff Rosenthal, DVM and Exec. Director of Idaho Humane Society was kind enough to  tranquilize them with a dart so we could get them to their soft release site.  They were held in another enclosure at the release site for two weeks until one evening we left the gates open so  they were free to leave (which they did sometime during that night) and start their new life.  (Coyote pups leave their parents October/November)  We had these pups late May through their release in November.
coyote pup 5/15
coyote pup 5/15

My Coyote 2

My Coyote 3

coyote pup may 15
coyote pup may 15

 

Beaver mauled by dog‏

This beaver had been mauled by a dog at least a week or more before it came to us.  This poor animal’s  hind end and the base of its tail were severely infected from old bite wounds.  The beaver was quite thin and dehydrated.  Septic shock had set in and he  wasn’t going to regain use of his ‘mighty’ tail if he could have beat the infection. A sad scenario, but he had to be euthanized.  Dogs running near the river or other wetlands need to be watched closely so as not to harass nor injure wildlife.

Beaver dog attack Apr '14
Beaver dog attack Apr ’14
Beaver dog attack Apr '14
Beaver dog attack Apr ’14

Injured Beaver 082

Beaver attacked by dogs Apr '14
Beaver attacked by dogs Apr ’14

Brazilian free-tailed bat‏

Mexican free-tail Apr '14
Mexican free-tail Apr ’14

We received this female Brazilian free-tailed bat (also commonly called Mexican free-tailed) in early Apr ’14.  It was only the third free-tail found in Idaho, which makes it pretty special and exciting.  It was found grounded out by the penitentiary more than likely on its spring migration.  At 9 gms, it was a bit underweight, but not surprisingly due possible weight loss during migration.  Our weather here was still a bit cool, therefore a lack of insects could further deplete her fat reserves.  Her pelage was a bit rough and disheveled. By release time in May, she had gained a whopping two grams, flew beautifully and with our warmer weather; she was taken back out to where she was found originally and released to continue on her journey to Arizona, California or wherever she was headed back in mid-April.

Mexican free-tail Apr '14
Mexican free-tail Apr ’14

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Mexican free-tail Mar '14
Mexican free-tail Mar ’14
Mexican free-tail Aprl'14
Mexican free-tail Aprl’14

Juvenile raccoon hanging by both hands from trap attached to patio arbor.

Juvenile raccoon hanging by both hands from trap attached to patio arbor.

Dangles Rescue 6
You can see where the home owner attached the trap to the patio arbor.
Dangles Rescue 2
This young raccoon hung there all night.
Dangles Rescue 1
A concerned neighbor called AIDA for help.
Dangles Rescue 5
She was hanging by both hands.
Dangles as she was affectionately titled was quickly taken to the Vet.
This is Dangles immediately after being removed from trap (her fingers on one hand were practically amputated). Dangles as she was affectionately titled was quickly taken to the Vet.
Trap removed from beam exposing bait used.
Trap removed from beam exposing bait used.

Dangles has been recuperating at AIDA since her terrifying ordeal in September 2015.  She is showing great signs of improvement.  While both of her hands peeled, the injuries are healing.  Looks like she will soon be released with her friend Rocky  in May 2016.

Dangles Recuperating at AIDA (2)
Dangles is Recuperating at AIDA
Dangles  Recuperating at AIDA 2 (2)
Scared but doing so much better…Dangles is Recuperating and using her hands.

Paul Martin’s Rattle Snake Rescue

The story below is told in first person by AIDA volunteer, Paul Martin on July 25, 2015:

“I don’t have the opportunity to catch rattlers very often but I did tonight.
This is about a 9 year old snake caught in netting for birds.”
 
NOTE: This bird netting was put down to protect strawberry plants from birds and rodents, but almost cost this rattlesnake its life.  Thank you to the caring homeowner who alerted us to this almost tragedy and was most helpful in the mission to free it. 
"This is when I first got there and controlled the head with my capture stick".
“This is when I first got there and controlled the head with my capture stick”.

 

rattle snake rescue by Paul ‏ 5
“I controlled the rattler while the guy cut off netting”

 

rattle snake rescue by Paul‏ photo 2 rattle snake rescue by Paul‏rattle snake rescue by Paul‏ photo 1